Info blog posts

INFO BLOG 8. Interpreting your IELTS scores
09.17.2020

Interpreting your IELTS scores

Here are some examples of how marks are translated into IELTS band scores.

INFO BLOG 7. TOEFL exam changes
05.21.2020

Below you will see a side-by-side comparison of the old TOEFL and the new TOEFL, after August 1, 2019. 

INFO BLOG 7. B1 Preliminary and B1 Preliminary for Schools - 2020 exam update
04.28.2020

Cambridge English Qualifications

B1 Preliminary and B1 Preliminary for Schools - 2020 exam update

What’s new?

Reading and Writing have been divided into separate papers. There are now four papers (rather than three).

INFO BLOG 6. NEEDS ANALYSIS, COURSE DESIGN AND LESSON PLANNING
07.13.2019

Identifying the language needs of your student and designing a course that matches up with them effectively is one of the most challenging aspects of one-to-one teaching. 

INFO Blog 5. Different learning styles
02.17.2018

The VAK Learning Styles Model was developed by psychologists in the 1920s to classify the most common ways that people learn. According to the model, most of us prefer to learn in one of three ways: visual, auditory or kinesthetic (although, in practice, we generally "mix and match" these three styles).

INFO BLOG 4. What's the difference between IELTS Academic, IELTS General and IELTS Life Skills?
01.31.2018

What’s the difference between IELTS Academic, IELTS General and IELTS Life Skills?
 

Choose an exam format depending on your needs!

INFO BLOG 3. Updated test specification for Cambridge English: STARTERS from January 2018
01.03.2018

The updated Cambridge English: Starters test will start being used for exam sessions from January 2018.

INFO BLOG 2. Do you know what is 'Extended Certification'?
12.19.2017

Cambridge English examinations use 'Extended Certification', which means that they give you additional credit for the language skills you demonstrate in the exam.

INFO BLOG 1. Key Changes in Cambridge English First and Advanced examinations as of January 2015.
12.14.2017

Language blog posts

LANGUAGE BLOG 14. American and British English
10.15.2020

Standard American English and standard British English are very similar. There are a few differences in the use of structures and in spelling rules, and rather more differences of vocabulary and idiom. Modern British English is heavily influenced by American English, so some contrasts are disappearing. Pronunciation is sometimes very different, but most American and British speakers can understand each other easily.

LANGUAGE BLOG 13. Common adverb + adjective collocations
10.13.2020

These collocations are taken from the British National Corpus.

LANGUAGE BLOG 12. GRAMMAR FOR EMPHASIS
10.08.2020

What grammatical strategies can you use to make your English more emphatic?

The ten strategies given here should not be used all the time in your speaking or writing. If you were to use them all the time, their impact would be lost! Instead, it is better to use them occasionally, in order to maximize the effect which they can have.

LANGUAGE BLOG 11. Writing a story
09.24.2020

In the Writing paper, there may be a question which asks you to write about an event or tell a story. The question might ask for this in the form of a short story or a description of an event.

LANGUAGE BLOG 10. Checklist for writing
09.14.2020

Use a revision checklist! When you revise, you should check the content and language of your essay. You need to make sure that the content is well developed and well organized and that you have used correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation. Use this revision checklist to practise revising!

LANGUAGE BLOG 9. How to describe a person
09.11.2020
LANGUAGE BLOG 8. How to describe trends
08.05.2020

A trend is a movement of data in a general direction over time. In IELTS Academic exams, the first writing task is usually a line graph, bar chart, pie chart or table that you will have to describe, so describing trends is essential.

LANGUAGE BLOG 7. Words that sound the same
05.21.2020

The words in this section are homophones (words that sound the same but are spelled differently). It is easy to confuse them.

LANGUAGE BLOG 6. What grammatical strategies can I use to make my English more empathic?
07.13.2019
LANGUAGE BLOG 5. Abbreviations and acronyms
03.06.2018

Do you suffer from FOMO? Well, IMO, you’re not alone. If you fear missing out on the latest new words, then you’ve come to the right place.
 

LANGUAGE BLOG 4. Inversion
01.09.2018

What is ‘inversion’?
 

When we want to emphasise an event because it is new, rare, unexpected, sudden, impossible, etc. we can use negative or restrictive adverbials followed by inverted word order:
 

I had never been there before. > Never before had I been there.

They didn't try to help me. > Not once did they try to help me.

When he came home we realised we had missed him. > Only when he came home did we realise we had missed him.

LANGUAGE BLOG 3. VERBS OF MOVEMENT
01.02.2018

Study following verbs of movement!

LANGUAGE BLOG 2. Writing about events: Ways of linking ideas and actions
12.18.2017

Ways of linking ideas and actions
 

Another way to bring variety into your composition is to use different connecting words and phrases (linkers) like although, when, however.


 

Study the following linking words and phrases.

LANGUAGE BLOG 1. Story-telling tenses
12.13.2017

Writing about events


Stories will be more interesting to read if you can avoid using only the Past Simple tense, e.g. ‘First we went to … and then we saw … and then I played …’


Most stories use a variety of past tenses. Read the following review of story-telling tenses.